m187

Math 187 course materials

Math 187 homework

Week 13 (Due Tuesday, November 27 at 12pm)

  1. Scheinerman 47.1, 47.2, 47.3, 47.16

Week 12 (Not due—just to study!)

  1. Scheinerman, 37.13

  2. Scheinerman, 38.1, 38.3, 38.4

  3. Chapter 5 self test 1, 4, 5, 11, 13

  4. Chapter 7 self test 7, 12

Week 11 (Due Tuesday, November 6 at 12pm)

  1. Complete and turn in the Clock Arithmetic handout.

  2. Scheinerman, 35.1, 35.2, 35.4

  3. Scheinerman, 36.1

Week 10 (Due Tuesday, October 30 at 12pm)

  1. Scheinerman, 25.2, 25.3, 25.4

  2. Scheinerman, 26.1, 26.9, 26.11

Week 9 (Due Tuesday, October 23 at 12pm)

  1. Scheinerman, 24.2, 24.6, 24.8

  2. Scheinerman, 24.3, 24.10

  3. Write the complete solution to Exam 2, Problem 6. You can earn up to 4 bonus points on the exam.

Week 8 (Not due—just to study!)

  1. Scheinerman, Chapter 3 self test 14, 15, 18, 19, 20

  2. Scheinerman, Chapter 4 self test 3, 6, 7, 8, 15

Week 7 (Due Tuesday, october 9 at 12pm)

  1. Scheinerman, 20.10, 20.13

  2. Scheinerman, 22.4(a)(e), 22.5(a)(f)

  3. Scheinerman, 22.10

Week 6 (Due Tuesday, October 2 at 12pm)

  1. Scheinerman, 17.15

  2. Scheinerman, 18.1, 18.8, 18.11

  3. Scheinerman, 19.1, 19.8

  4. Scheinerman, 20.5

Week 5 ( Due Tuesday, September 25 at 12pm)

  1. Scheinerman, 17.2, 17.4, 17.12, 17.14

  2. The game of dominoes consists of a pack of tiles, each tile has two ends, and each end either has 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 spots on it. How many tiles are there in a pack? How did you count it and why does it work?

Week 4 (Due Tuesday, September 18 at 12pm)

  1. Scheinerman, 11.1, 11.4, 11.5

  2. Scheinerman, 12.1, 12.3, 12.11

Week 3 (Due Tuesday, September 11 at 12pm)

  1. 9.6 (include a non-calculator explanation!), 9.11

  2. 10.1, 10.4

  3. 10.10

Week 2 (Due Thursday, September 6 at 2pm)

  1. Scheinerman, exercises 5.6, 5.18, 5.20

  2. Scheinerman, exercise 6.6

  3. Scheinerman, exercises 7.3, 7.4

  4. Scheinerman, exercise 9.9

Week 1 (Due Tuesday, August 28 at 12pm)

  1. Read the student’s preface and sections 1–5 of Scheinerman. Then write a one or two paragraph response. You may use the following questons as prompts to help you think of ideas. What do we seek to achieve in mathematics? What methods do we use to achieve these goals? What is the role of logic in the development of mathematics? What are the roles of definitions, theorems, and proofs? What questions do you have?

  2. Review your work from Activity 1, questions 5 and 6. Write a mathematical statement summarizing your conclusion (theorem). Then, as best as you can, write a logical explanation of why your statement is true (proof).

  3. Scheinerman, exercises 3.6, 3.7
    3.6: Define what it means for an integer to be a perfect square. For example, 0,1,4,9,16, etc are perfect squares. Your definition should start with “An integer x is called a perfect square provided…”
    3.7: Define what it means for one number to be the square root of another number.

  4. Scheinerman, exercises 4.4, 4.12(a)
    4.4. Consider the two statemens “If A, then B” and “(not A) or B”. Under what circumstances are these statements true? When are they false? Explain why these statements are, in essence, identical.
    4.12(a). More about conjectures. What can you say about the sum of consecutive odd numbers starting with 1? Evaluate 1, 1+3, 1+3+5, 1+3+5+7, and so on. Formulate a conjecture.

  5. Scheinerman, exercise 5.1
    5.1. Prove that the sum of two odd integers is even.